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Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium Strategy

At Mill Lane Primary School, we have high aspirations and ambitions for your children and we believe that no child should be left behind. We strongly believe that it is not about where our children come from but their passion and thirst for knowledge, and their dedication and commitment to learning that make the difference between success and failure. We are determined to ensure that the children of Mill Lane are given every chance to realise their full potential. Our school moto is, ‘We are unique and together we create a global family.  Shoot for the moon and you’ll land amongst the stars.’

We seek to ensure that every child has the best possible start to their education, that barriers to learning are removed and that every child has the opportunity to reach their full potential.  We see every child as an individual, but recognise that our school community has a diverse range of needs:

  • 65% of our children are learning English as an additional language (EAL);
  • Some of our children are new to the country and have never had any previous schooling;
  • We have a highly mobile population, meaning that many children do not stay with us throughout their whole primary education;
  • Many of our children with SEN have difficulties with speech, language and communication;
  • The school serves an area of high social deprivation;
  • Many children have multiple vulnerabilities.

47% of our pupils attract extra funding through the Pupil Premium Grant (PPG), as well as 53% who are entitled to the Early Years PPG.  The government provides this additional funding to schools in order to help them to address the barriers to learning. It is for each school to decide how this money should be spent, in order to meet the specific needs of the children in the school.  Due to the large percentage of pupils who attract additional funding at Mill Lane, in many cases we are focusing on enhancing provision to meet the needs of all children. In these cases, the Pupil Premium is used in proportionately.

Barriers to learning include:

  • Language and vocabulary deficit
  • Limited social and cultural experience, ambition and aspiration
  • Mobility
  • Social deprivation
  • Extended leave
  • Social and emotional barriers
  • Poverty including ‘working poor’
  • Lower than average starting points
  • Health is in the lower 10% nationally for categories such as oral health
  • Undervalue education

 

At Mill Lane, we use the PPG to address six main objectives:

  • Early intervention: this approach ensures that the school is able to work with children and families to address needs as soon as possible;
  • Attendance: educational achievement requires good attendance;
  • Special Educational Needs: additional specialist resources;
  • Academic achievement: additional teaching and resources to promote progress for all, including support for parents to promote progress for all;
  • Participation: provision of resources to ensure that no child is unable to take part in any activity because of financial disadvantage;
  • Resilience: a school-wide focus on developing a growth mindset, ensuring that our children learn how to overcome barriers for themselves.

The impact of spending from the PPG is regularly reviewed by the Governing Body.  The dates for review this year are:

  • 23rd October 2018
  • 26th February 2019
  • 4th June 2019

Pupil Premium Allocation 2018-2019

The Pupil Premium grant is a government initiative of an additional allocation of funding designed for schools to address current inequalities and tackle disadvantage by supporting the attainment and progress of specific groups of children who are vulnerable to possible underachievement. The Government are not dictating how schools should spend this money, but are clear that schools will need to employ the strategies that they know will support their pupils to increase their attainment.  In order to receive this additional funding, as a school we are required to provide information to the Department for Education confirming which children meet the government criteria:

The Pupil Premium Grant per pupil for 2018 to 2019 is as follows:

Disadvantaged pupils

Pupil premium per pupil

Pupils in year groups reception to year 6 recorded as Ever 6 free school meals

£1,320

Pupils in years 7 to 11 recorded as Ever 6 FSM

£935

Looked-after children (LAC) defined in the Children Act 1989 as one who is in the care of, or provided with accommodation by, an English local authority

£2,300

Children who have ceased to be looked after by a local authority in England and Wales because of adoption, a special guardianship order, a child arrangements order or a residence order

The Early Years Pupil Premium (EYPP) gives providers additional funding to support disadvantaged    three and four year old pupils

£2,300

 

 

£300

 

Service children

Pupil premium per pupil

Pupils in year groups reception to year 11 recorded as Ever 6 service child or in receipt of a child pension from the Ministry of Defence

£300

Education & Skills Funding Agency

To be eligible for free school meals you must be in receipt of the appropriate benefits and have submitted an application for free school meals to the Local Authority Benefits Team (details of which are available from the school office).

If you qualify for the appropriate benefits, but have chosen not to apply for free school meals, please consider applying. You do not have to take up the free school meal to attract the funding. Free school meals cannot be backdated, so you should only apply if you currently qualify.

Our Philosophy and Principles

We are fully committed to providing opportunities for all pupils to succeed and to provide the necessary interventions to ensure that success is experienced by all. We ensure that

  • Teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all pupils
  • Appropriate provision is made for pupils who belong to vulnerable groups, this includes ensuring that the needs of disadvantaged pupils are adequately assessed and addressed
  • we recognise that not all pupils who receive free school meals will be disadvantaged
  • We also recognise that not all pupils who are disadvantaged are registered or qualify for free school meals
  • We reserve the right to allocate the Pupil Premium funding to support any pupil or groups of pupils the school has legitimately identified as being disadvantaged
  • Pupil premium funding will be allocated following data analysis and pupil progress meetings which identify priority classes, groups or individuals.
  • Children experience quality first teaching, meeting the needs of each individual child
  • Every child reaches or exceeds age-related expectations in reading, writing and mathematics
  • No child is disadvantaged due to inability to pay for school trips, residential visits, music tuition or other extra-curricular activities
  • Pupil Premium funding is allocated after a needs analysis and exploration of what research tells us to provide the most appropriate support and intervention for pupils

Pupil Premium Grant Allocation

2018-19 106 pupils £139,920
2017-18 103 pupils £135,960
2016-17 105 pupils £144,180
2015-16 108 pupils £142,560
2014-15 115 pupils £149,500

Early Years Pupil Premium Grant Allocation

2018-19 Details available February 2019
2017-18 8 pupils £2,500
2016-17 24 pupils £7,200

         

Dates of Pupil Premium Reviews

23rd October 2018

26th February 2019

4th June 2019

AMBITION FOR DISADVANTAGED PUPILS IN OUR SCHOOL – SUCCESS CRITERIA

Barriers to learning will be removed and children in Mill Lane will achieve their full potential

·         Academic achievement  (66%)

·         Early intervention            (59%)                                                   

·         Special Educational Needs  (36%)

·         Attendance                       (27%)

·         Participation                     (21%)                                                                                                                                    C   = Cohort, including ARP children

·         Resilience, emotional health and well-being  (14%)                                                                                               M = Mainstream children only                                                                                                                           

Supporting rationale and research for chosen action:

·         Education Endowment Fund * (See p8 & 9)

·         Higher Achievement Research Transforming Tees **

·         Effective Practice Case Study: St Bede’s Primary School, Stockton ***

MAIN OBJECTIVES

ACTION TO ADDRESS BARRIER

PLANNED IMPACT

MONITORING OF EFFECTIVENESS

AMOUNT ALLOCATED

Academic achievement and early intervention

 

 

Progress to date

 

 

 

 

 

 

Intended Outcomes by July 2018

Improved outcomes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The employment of an additional 0.6 teacher employed in KS2 to enable Year 6 children to be taught in smaller groups *

 

 

The employment of an additional 0.5 teacher (DH) in Y2 to enable children to be taught in smaller groups *

 

 

 

The allocation of an additional TA in year 1 to enable adults to provide more high quality 1:1 feedback and feedforward to pupils *

 

 

 

The allocation of an additional TA in Reception to enable EYFS interventions*

 

The employment of a TA in EY & KS1 to support speech, language & communication including oral language and semantics and learning interventions identified in Pupil Progress Meetings

 

The allocation of 1.6 highly trained TAs to develop and deliver high quality early intervention and support with early SALT provision and self-care *

 

*Booster Reading \programme throughout school including Mid-day supervisor overtime to support 1:1 reading (BRP trained), and voluntary Right to Read Programme with Johnson Matthey, Youth for Christ and volunteer readers.

 

PiXL intervention

 

Membership of the EEF and Literacy Campaign *

All children to have access to Quality First Teaching raise attainment and rates of progress

 

Children to have access to support to plug gaps in learning and to pre-teach to enable children to access age appropriate curriculum

 

Children to have access reading intervention and individual pupil support as required

 

 

 

All pupils have a balanced curriculum and specific interventions delivered by expert practitioners which will lead to improved outcomes

 

 

 

Improved outcomes

 

 

 

 

Improved reading outcomes

Promote a love of reading at home

 

 

 

 

Improved KS2 outcomes

 

Improved outcomes

 

Improved KS2 outcomes

 

 

 

 

Improved KS1 outcomes

 

 

 

 

 

Improved Y1 phonics outcomes

 

 

 

 

 

Improved EY GLD outcomes

 

Improved outcomes, Increased vocabulary.

Improved listening skills language and understanding.

 

Improved outcomes

 

 

 

 

Children’s confidence in and enjoyment of reading increases.

Children make good progress in reading.

 

£10,280

 

 

 

 

£11,300

 

 

 

 

 

£4,880

 

 

 

 

 

 

£10,230

 

 

£13,860

 

 

 

 

 

£17,900

 

 

 

 

£12,100

 

 

 

 

 

 

£1,680

 

 

 

£550

 

Special Educational Needs

 

 

Progress to date

 

 

 

Intended Outcomes by July 2018

Reduce waiting times for specialist support

Regular monitoring of progress

 

The employment of an additional Speech and Language Therapist *

 

 

 

 

 

 

The allocation of an Educational Psychologist to ensure faster access to services

Children’s speech and language development is supported and any barriers are addressed which will impact on their wider attainment, self-esteem and self-confidence

 

Children have access to specialist assessment and support

Early identification of children with Special Educational Needs who require specialist support

Regular monitoring of progress

Increase staff expertise in supporting children with SEN

 

£11,200

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£5,500

Attendance  – with specific focus on Persistent absence

 

Progress to date

 

Intended Outcomes by July 2018

Persistent absence improves to be in line with national average

 

Attendance review and Incentives to improve attendance

100% weekly attendance treats

100% term attendance vouchers

100% year attendance trip

Increased attendance of all groups which will impact on attainment and progress

Weekly monitoring or particular children

 

Half termly data collections

£2,000

Participation

 

Progress to date

 

 

 

Intended Outcomes by July 2018

100% participation in visits

 

Subsidise parental contributions to enable all children to access enrichment activities including educational visits, theatre visits and residential opportunities

 

 

Purchase uniform sweatshirts, PE Kits and Book bags

 

 

 

 

 

 

Children can access visits to support their learning across the curriculum which will enhance children’s learning experiences which will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the curriculum

 

Children develop a range of life skills and experiences and develop a love of learning

 

To ensure that poverty proofing enables all children to participate fully in education and does not feel discriminated against

 

Children have opportunities to participate in a wide range of events and visits.

 

 

Children wear school uniform with pride. Through all aspects of school, children consistently display good attitudes to learning, respect for school and the core values

£9,920

 

 

 

 

£9,520

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resilience, emotional health and well-

 

 

Progress to date

 

 

 

Intended Outcomes by July 2018

Parents can access support from other agencies

being

Parent Support Advisor(PSA), Julie Cole, to work with our more vulnerable families on: Attendance, Safeguarding (Child Protection and Early Help) and Emotional well being

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provide a family counselling service for vulnerable pupils to enable a greater range and depth of issues faced by children and families to be tackled

 

 

2 members of staff to specialise in attachment training

 

1 member of staff to train to become a Wellbeing Champion

 

Stability of key children, enabling them to attend, be ready to learn and be emotionally supported.

Families have access to an identified adult who can advise them and help them access support from other agencies.

 

Children have access to emotional support and counselling

 

 

 

Specialist knowledge and practice in school to support

 

Specialist knowledge and practice in school to support

 

 

Early identification of families who require additional support through Early Help

 

 

 

 

 

Children’s emotional presentation improves so that they are ready for learning.

 

Reduce barrier to learning

 

Reduce barrier to learning

£12,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

£5,000

 

 

 

 

 

£1800

 

 

£200

 

 

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        £137,960

EEF Research

Evidence Statement

Evidence Strength

Actions Implemented

Date

By Whom

Impact

  Develop pupils’ speaking and listening skills and wider understanding of language

Extensive

·         Tracks to Literacy Scheme introduced to EYFS and KS1.

·         Talk Boost intervention delivered by KS1 additional TA.

·         Additional EAL training to help develop vocabulary

·         Became a Talk for Learning School

Autumn 2

 

Autumn 1 and ongoing

Spring 1

SENCo

 

 

 

EAL Advisor

TAs are reporting greater increase in confidence in pupils but cannot measure quantitatively at this point.

Use a balanced and engaging approach to developing reading, which integrates both decoding and comprehension skills

Extensive

·         RWI books introduced into KS1.

·         New guided reading scheme introduced so that have access to more challenging resources. 

·         New reading scheme purchased to promote enjoyment of reading at home.

·         Introduction of Cracking Comprehension

·         Booster Reading Programme : A system is now in place across school so that all classes receive 1:1 reading support from trained adults throughout the week

·         Reading Plus introduced

Spring 1

Spring 2016

 

 

Spring 1

 

Autumn 2

Autumn 1

English Lead

 

 

 

 

HT

Right 2 Read, Youth 4 Christ, MDS.

Reading Predictions:

Y2 64% (M) 55% (C)

Rec 59%(M) 55% (C)

 

Effectively implement a systematic phonics programme

Very Extensive

·         RWI introduced to EYFS and KS1.

·         Whole school staff training to ensure that all staff understand the principles behind effective phonics teaching

Spring 1

English lead, KI (Phonics Lead)

·         After testing Yr 1 pupils, phonics projections at 69%; Yr 2 re-check at 50%.

Teach pupils strategies for developing and monitoring their reading comprehension

Extensive

·         Introduction of Cracking Comprehension across school, with training.

·         All staff received inference and deduction training as part of PD Day

·         All teaching staff have received Reciprocal reading training.

Autumn 2

 

Autumn1

 

Autumn 1 and 2

HT

 

HT

Reading Predictions:

Y2 64% (M) 55% (C)

Rec 59%(M) 55% (C)

 

Teach pupils strategies for planning and monitoring their writing

Moderate

·         Introduction of BIG Write across school

·         PD Day on effective marking, editing and proof reading of children’s writing

Autumn 1

 

Spring 2

English Lead

HT

Writing predictions:

Rec  59% (M)  55% (C)

Y1   63%(M)    58% (C)

Y2   61% (M)   52% (C)

Promote fluent written transcription skills by encouraging extensive and effective practise and explicitly teaching spelling

Limited

·         Year 2+ have access to the RWI spelling programme to ensure all spelling patterns are taught across school.

Autumn 2

English Lead

Use high quality information about pupils current capabilities to select the best next steps for teaching

Moderate

·         Regular pupil progress meetings held after assessment week to monitor progress and discuss next steps for pupils who appear ‘stuck’

·         Wellbeing Champion

·         2 Attachment specialists

On-going

HT

Teachers more accountable for pupil’s progress and discussions re interventions and new strategies for pupils falling behind take place.

Use high-quality structured interventions to help pupils who are struggling with their literacy

Extensive

·         Talk Boost, Tracks to Literacy, 1:1 RWI phonics intervention carried out on pupils identified after pupil’s progress meetings or assessments.

·         Introduce PiXL across KS1 and KS2

·         Master Maths Hub school

On-going

TAs, Phonics lead

TA feedback to T effectiveness of these programmes.  This is again monitored to ensure that chn are making grounds as a result of interventions during PPMeetings.

 

 

Pupil Premium Strategy

 

 

At Mill Lane Primary School, we have high aspirations and ambitions for your children and we believe that no child should be left behind. We strongly believe that it is not about where our children come from but their passion and thirst for knowledge, and their dedication and commitment to learning that make the difference between success and failure. We are determined to ensure that the children of Mill Lane are given every chance to realise their full potential. Our school moto is, ‘We are unique and together we create a global family.  Shoot for the moon and you’ll land amongst the stars.’

 

 

We seek to ensure that every child has the best possible start to their education, that barriers to learning are removed and that every child has the opportunity to reach their full potential.  We see every child as an individual, but recognise that our school community has a diverse range of needs:

 

  • Over 50% of our children are learning English as an additional language (EAL);
  • Some of our children are new to the country and have never had any previous schooling;
  • We have a highly mobile population, meaning that many children do not stay with us throughout their whole primary education;
  • Many of our children with SEN have difficulties with speech, language and communication;
  • The school serves an area of high social deprivation;
  • Many children have multiple vulnerabilities.

56% of our pupils attract extra funding through the Pupil Premium Grant (PPG), as well as 60% who are entitled to the Early Years PPG.  The government provides this additional funding to schools in order to help them to address the barriers to learning. It is for each school to decide how this money should be spent, in order to meet the specific needs of the children in the school.  Due to the large percentage of pupils who attract additional funding at Mill Lane, in many cases we are focusing on enhancing provision to meet the needs of all children. In these cases, the Pupil Premium is used in proportionately.

 

 

Barriers to learning include:

 

  • Language and vocabulary deficit
  • Limited social and cultural experience, ambition and aspiration
  • Mobility
  • Social deprivation
  • Extended leave
  • Social and emotional barriers
  • Poverty including ‘working poor’
  • Lower than average starting points
  • Health is in the lower 10% nationally for categories such as oral health
  • Undervalue education

 

At Mill Lane, we use the PPG to address six main objectives:

 

 

  • Early intervention: this approach ensures that the school is able to work with children and families to address needs as soon as possible;
  • Attendance: educational achievement requires good attendance;
  • Special Educational Needs: additional specialist resources;
  • Academic achievement: additional teaching and resources to promote progress for all, including support for parents to promote progress for all;
  • Participation: provision of resources to ensure that no child is unable to take part in any activity because of financial disadvantage;
  • Resilience: a school-wide focus on developing a growth mindset, ensuring that our children learn how to overcome barriers for themselves.

The impact of spending from the PPG is regularly reviewed by the Governing Body.  The dates for review this year are:

 

 

  • 19th September 2017
  • 16th January 2018
  • 8th May 2018

Pupil Premium Allocation

 

The Pupil Premium grant is a government initiative of an additional allocation of funding designed for schools to address current inequalities and tackle disadvantage by supporting the attainment and progress of specific groups of children who are vulnerable to possible underachievement. The Government are not dictating how schools should spend this money, but are clear that schools will need to employ the strategies that they know will support their pupils to increase their attainment.

 

In order to receive this additional funding, as a school we are required to provide information to the Department for Education confirming which children meet the government criteria:

 

Category Allocation per Eligible Pupil
FSM Children entitled to free school meals £1,320
Ever 6 Children who have received fee school meals in the last 6 years £1,320
CLA Children who have been looked after continuously for at least 6 months or who are looked after for one day or more, and those who are adopted from care or leave care under a special guardianship or residence order £1,900
Forces Children with a parent in the armed services £300
EYPP Children who are 3 and 4 years old who meet the above criteria £300

 To be eligible for free school meals you must be in receipt of the appropriate benefits and have submitted an application for free school meals to the Local Authority Benefits Team (details of which are available from the school office).

 

If you qualify for the appropriate benefits, but have chosen not to apply for free school meals, please consider applying. You do not have to take up the free school meal to attract the funding. Free school meals cannot be backdated, so you should only apply if you currently qualify.

Our Philosophy and Principles

 

We are fully committed to providing opportunities for all pupils to succeed and to provide the necessary interventions to ensure that success is experienced by all. We ensure that:-

 

  • Teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all pupils
  • Appropriate provision is made for pupils who belong to vulnerable groups, this includes ensuring that the needs of disadvantaged pupils are adequately assessed and addressed
  • we recognise that not all pupils who receive free school meals will be disadvantaged
  • We also recognise that not all pupils who are disadvantaged are registered or qualify for free school meals
  • We reserve the right to allocate the Pupil Premium funding to support any pupil or groups of pupils the school has legitimately identified as being disadvantaged
  • Pupil premium funding will be allocated following data analysis and pupil progress meetings which identify priority classes, groups or individuals.
  • Children experience quality first teaching, meeting the needs of each individual child
  • Every child reaches or exceeds age-related expectations in reading, writing and mathematics
  • No child is disadvantaged due to inability to pay for school trips, residential visits, music tuition or other extra-curricular activities
  • Pupil Premium funding is allocated after a needs analysis and exploration of what research tells us to provide the most appropriate support and intervention for pupils
Pupil Premium Grant Allocation 2017-18  103 pupils £135,960
2016-17 105 pupils £144,180
2015-16  108 pupils £142,560
2014-15 115 pupils £149,500
Early Years Pupil Premium Grant Allocation 2017-18  8 pupils £2,500
2016-17 24 pupils £7,200
Dates of Pupil Premium Reviews 19th September 2017
16th January 2018
8th May 2018

AMBITION FOR DISADVANTAGED PUPILS IN OUR SCHOOL – SUCCESS CRITERIA

Barriers to learning will be removed and children in Mill Lane will achieve their full potential

·         Academic achievement 

·         Early intervention                                                            

·         Special Educational Needs

·         Attendance

·         Participation                                                                                                                                                                   C   = Cohort, including ARP children

·         Resilience, emotional health and well-being only                                                                                                   M = Mainstream children                                                                                                                          

Supporting rationale and research for chosen action:

·         Education Endowment Fund * (See p8 & 9)

·         Higher Achievement Research Transforming Tees **

·         Effective Practice Case Study: St Bede’s Primary School, Stockton ***

MAIN OBJECTIVES ACTION TO ADDRESS BARRIER PLANNED IMPACT MONITORING OF EFFECTIVENESS AMOUNT ALLOCATED

Academic achievement and early intervention

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The employment of an additional teacher employed in KS2 to enable Year 6 children to be taught in smaller groups *

 

The employment of an additional 0.5 teacher (DH) in Y2 to enable children to be taught in smaller groups *

 

The allocation of an additional TA in year 1 to enable adults to provide more high quality 1:1 feedback and feedforward to pupils *

 

The allocation of an additional 0.5 teacher in Reception to enable EYFS interventions*

 

The employment of a TA in EY & KS1 to support speech, language & communication including oral language and semantics and learning interventions identified in Pupil Progress Meetings

 

The allocation of 1.5 highly trained TAs to develop and deliver high quality early intervention and support with early SALT provision and self-care *

 

*Booster Reading \programme throughout school including Mid-day supervisor overtime to support 1:1 reading (BRP trained), and voluntary Right to Read Programme with Johnson Matthey, Youth for Christ and volunteer readers.

 

PiXL intervention

 

Membership of the EEF and Literacy Campaign *

All children to have access to Quality First Teaching raise attainment and rates of progress

 

Children to have access to support to plug gaps in learning and to pre-teach to enable children to access age appropriate curriculum

 

Children to have access reading intervention and individual pupil support as required

 

All pupils have a balanced curriculum and specific interventions delivered by expert practitioners which will lead to improved outcomes

 

Improved outcomes

 

 

Improved reading outcomes

Promote a love of reading at home

 

 

Improved KS2 outcomes

 

Improved outcomes

 

Improved KS2 outcomes

 

Improved KS1 outcomes

 

 

Improved Y1 phonics outcomes

 

 

Improved EY GLD outcomes

 

 

Improved outcomes, Increased vocabulary.

Improved listening skills language and understanding.

 

Improved outcomes

 

 

Children’s confidence in and enjoyment of reading increases.

Children make good progress in reading.

£10,280

 

 £11,300

 

 

£4,880

 

 

£10,230

 

 

£13,860

 

 

£17,900

 

 

£12,100

 

 

£1,680

 

£550

Special Educational Needs

 

The employment of an additional Speech and Language Therapist *

 

 

The allocation of an Educational Psychologist to ensure faster access to services

Children’s speech and language development is supported and any barriers are addressed which will impact on their wider attainment, self-esteem and self-confidence

 

Children have access to specialist assessment and support

Reduce waiting times for specialist support

Regular monitoring of progress

 

Early identification of children with Special Educational Needs who require specialist support

Regular monitoring of progress

Increase staff expertise in supporting children with SEN

£11,200

 

 

£5,500

Attendance

Attendance review and Incentives to improve attendance

100% weekly attendance treats

100% term attendance vouchers

100% year attendance trip

Increased attendance of all groups which will impact on attainment and progress

Attendance improves to in line with national average

 

£2,000
Participation

Subsidise parental contributions to enable all children to access enrichment activities including educational visits, theatre visits and residential opportunities

 

 

 

 

 Purchase uniform sweatshirts, PE Kits and Book bags

Children can access visits to support their learning across the curriculum which will enhance children’s learning experiences which will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the curriculum

 

Children develop a range of life skills and experiences and develop a love of learning

 

To ensure that poverty proofing enables all children to participate fully in education and does not feel discriminated against

 

100% participation in visits

 

Children have opportunities to participate in a wide range of events and visits.

 

 

 

 

Children wear school uniform with pride. Through all aspects of school, children consistently display good attitudes to learning, respect for school and the core values

£7,960

 

 

 

 

 

£9,520

 

Resilience, emotional health and well-being

Provide a Parent Support Advisor(PSA), Julie Cole, to work with our more vulnerable families on: Attendance, Safeguarding (Child Protection and Early Help) and Emotional well being

 

 

 

Provide a family counselling service for vulnerable pupils to enable a greater range and depth of issues faced by children and families to be tackled

 

Stability of key children, enabling them to attend, be ready to learn and be emotionally supported.

 

Families have access to an identified adult who can advise them and help them access support from other agencies.

 

Children have access to emotional support and counselling

 

Parents can access support from other agencies

 

 

Early identification of families who require additional support through Early Help

 

Children’s emotional presentation improves so that they are ready for learning.

£12,000

 

 

 

 

£5,000

 

 

 

EEF Research

 

Evidence Statement Evidence Strength Actions Implemented Date By Whom Impact
  Develop pupils’ speaking and listening skills and wider understanding of language Extensive

·         Tracks to Literacy Scheme introduced to EYFS and KS1.

·         Talk Boost intervention delivered by KS1 additional TA.

·         Additional EAL training to help develop vocabulary

Autumn 2

 

Autumn 1 and ongoing

Spring 1

SENCo

 

 

EAL Advisor

TAs are reporting greater increase in confidence in pupils but cannot measure quantitatively at this point.
Use a balanced and engaging approach to developing reading, which integrates both decoding and comprehension skills Extensive

·         RWI books introduced into KS1.

·         New guided reading scheme introduced so that have access to more challenging resources. 

·         New reading scheme purchased to promote enjoyment of reading at home.

·         Introduction of Cracking Comprehension

·         Booster Reading Programme : A system is now in place across school so that all classes receive 1:1 reading support from trained adults throughout the week

Spring 1

Spring 2016

 

Spring 1

 

Autumn 2

Autumn 1

English Lead

 

 

HT

Right 2 Read, Youth 4 Christ, MDS.

Reading Predictions:

Y2 64% (M) 55% (C)

Rec 59%(M) 55% (C)

 

Effectively implement a systematic phonics programme Very Extensive

·         RWI introduced to EYFS and KS1.

·         Whole school staff training to ensure that all staff understand the principles behind effective phonics teaching

Spring 1 English lead, KI (Phonics Lead) ·         After testing Yr 1 pupils, phonics projections at 69%; Yr 2 re-check at 50%.
Teach pupils strategies for developing and monitoring their reading comprehension Extensive

·         Introduction of Cracking Comprehension across school, with training.

·         All staff received inference and deduction training as part of PD Day

·         All teaching staff have received Reciprocal reading training.

Autumn 2

 

Autumn1

 

Autumn 1 and 2

HT

 

HT

Reading Predictions:

Y2 64% (M) 55% (C)

Rec 59%(M) 55% (C)

 

Teach pupils strategies for planning and monitoring their writing Moderate

·         Introduction of BIG Write across school

·         PD Day on effective marking, editing and proof reading of children’s writing

Autumn 1

 

Spring 2

English Lead

HT

Writing predictions:

Rec  59% (M)  55% (C)

Y1   63%(M)    58% (C)

Y2   61% (M)   52% (C)

Promote fluent written transcription skills by encouraging extensive and effective practise and explicitly teaching spelling Limited ·         Year 2+ have access to the RWI spelling programme to ensure all spelling patterns are taught across school. Autumn 2 English Lead
Use high quality information about pupils current capabilities to select the best next steps for teaching Moderate ·         Regular pupil progress meetings held after assessment week to monitor progress and discuss next steps for pupils who appear ‘stuck’ On-going HT Teachers more accountable for pupil’s progress and discussions re interventions and new strategies for pupils falling behind take place.
Use high-quality structured interventions to help pupils who are struggling with their literacy Extensive ·         Talk Boost, Tracks to Literacy, 1:1 RWI phonics intervention carried out on pupils identified after pupil’s progress meetings or assessments. On-going TAs, Phonics lead TA feedback to T effectiveness of these programmes.  This is again monitored to ensure that chn are making grounds as a result of interventions during PPMeetings.

 

2017-18 Spending

The Pupil Premium funding allocation was spent according to plan. There were no variations. Extra costs were covered by the school budget.

NB When reading data please bear in mind that up to 21% in each cohort is made up of children accessing the Speech, Language and Communication provision from across the authority and this typically means a corresponding proportion unlikely to achieve at age-related standards.

‘National Other’ means non disadvantaged.

Early Years

At their first statutory assessment, there is clear evidence of low levels of development for many of our pupil premium children. Early Years pupils have been specifically targeted to reduce the barriers to learning and progress.

48% of Reception pupils are disadvantaged – 14 pupils (13 boys and 1 girl). This significant gender difference has impacted on the data as there is a large number of SEN disadvantaged boys (9) in this cohort and only 1 disadvantaged girl.

 

50% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the GLD. Nationally, 73% of non-disadvantaged pupils achieved the GLD. Therefore, there is an achievement gap of 23%. This has doubled from 2017 but is significantly less than the gap in 2016.     

Despite the low starting points and high number of disadvantaged pupils, 50% is just below disadvantaged pupils nationally (56%).

Y1 Phonics

The impact of our efforts to improve literacy skills is evident in the Y1 phonics results.

53% of pupils are disadvantaged – 16 pupils (8 boys and 8 girls).

81.3% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the standard which is just short when compared to 84% of ‘Other’ pupils nationally. Therefore, there is an achievement gap of just 2.7% which is less than one child. This has narrowed by 11%.

National disadvantaged is 70%. The performance of disadvantaged pupils in school is 11% higher than disadvantaged pupils nationally. This has closed by 12%.

47% of pupils are Disadvantaged – 14 pupils (7 boys and 7 girls).

 

There is an extremely large number of SEN (43%) in this particular year group including 7 Y2 boys in the ARP which significantly impacts on data.

 

Reading

36% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the expected standard compared to 79% of  ‘Other’ pupils Nationally. There is an achievement gap of 43%. This has widened by 17%. National disadvantaged is 54%. Disadvantaged pupils are below disadvantaged pupils nationally by 18%. This has widened by 8%.

 

Writing

29% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the expected standard compared to 79% of  ‘Other’ pupils Nationally. There is an achievement gap of 43%. This has widened by 30%. National disadvantaged is 60%. Disadvantaged pupils are below disadvantaged pupils nationally by 25%.. This has widened by 21%.

 

Maths

36% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the expected standard compared to 79% of  ‘Other’ pupils Nationally. There is an achievement gap of 43%. This has widened by 23%. National disadvantaged is 62%. Disadvantaged pupils are below disadvantaged pupils nationally by 26%. This has widened by 23%.

 

KS1 Progress

In reading the progress of pupil premium children and the progress of non-pupil premium children is exactly the same. The gap has closed by 10%.

In writing the progress on non-disadvantaged pupils is still better than disadvantaged pupils. However, the gap has closed by 2%.

In maths the progress on non-disadvantaged pupils is still better than disadvantaged pupils. The gap has widened by 16%.

By the end of primary school the impact of pupil premium spending in Mill Lane is evident in the attainment and progress of pupil premium children.

55% of pupils are Disadvantaged – 16 pupils (8 boys and 8 girls).

 

Reading

50% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the expected standard compared to 77% of  ‘Other’ pupils Nationally. There is an achievement gap of 27%. This has narrowed by 16%. National disadvantaged is 60%. Disadvantaged pupils are 10% below Disadvantaged pupils nationally. This has narrowed by 6%.

 

Writing

56% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the expected standard compared to 81% of  ‘Other’ pupils Nationally. There is an achievement gap of 25%. This has narrowed by 25%. National disadvantaged is 66%. Disadvantaged pupils are 10% below Disadvantaged pupils nationally. This has widened by 7%.

 

Maths

56% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the expected standard compared to 80% of  ‘Other’ pupils Nationally. There is an achievement gap of 24%. This has narrowed by 19%. National disadvantaged is 63%. Disadvantaged pupils are 7% below Disadvantaged pupils nationally. This has narrowed by 12%.

 

SPaG

56% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the expected standard compared to 82% of  ‘Other’ pupils Nationally. There is an achievement gap of 26%. This has widened by 7%. National disadvantaged is 66%. Disadvantaged pupils are 10% below Disadvantaged pupils nationally. This has widened by 7%.

 

RWM

38% of disadvantaged pupils achieved the expected standard compared to 81% of  ‘Other’ pupils Nationally. There is an achievement gap of 43%. This has widened by 7%.  National disadvantaged is 48%. Disadvantaged pupils are 10% below Disadvantaged pupils nationally. This has narrowed by 7%.

 

KS2 Progress

In reading, pupil premium children have made more progress than non-pupil premium with a difference of 0.8. The gap has closed by 3.9.

In writing, pupil premium children have made more progress than non-pupil premium with a difference of 0.4. The gap has closed by 5.8.

In maths, pupil premium children have made more progress than non-pupil premium with a difference of 0.5. The gap has closed by 4.2.

Lessons Learned

Levels of deprivation at Mill Lane are considerably higher than nationally and the proportion of pupil premium children is considerably higher than national figures. A significant number of other children live in families who are just above the threshold (working-poor) and a significant number of other children are refugees and are not eligible for pupil premium funding but are in the lowest 5% in the country for deprivation. When planning the budget, including pupil premium spending, we work extremely hard to ensure that the maximum number of pupils benefit from pupil premium funding and that no child is discriminated against.

By the time children leave Mill Lane pupil premium children have caught up to non-pupil premium children and often overtaken them.  Whilst the plan to target specific older pupils across school continues to work, the plan to put funding into targeting younger children for early intervention and rapid progress is also working and will continue next year. Removing/reducing the barriers earlier means that children are able to access the curriculum for their year group sooner and more effectively.

Although the attainment of KS1 pupil premium children is lower than last year the progress this cohort have made from their low starting points is very pleasing. They have made good progress in reading, writing and maths. The gap is closing from last year in reading and in writing. It has widened in Maths. The school is now a Mastery Hub School and there is a real focus on the teaching of mastery in Y1.  PiXL maths intervention is being used in year 2 and pupil premium pays for an additional TA for this to take place.

In KS2 the gaps are narrowing against national average and national other. PiXL is being introduced across KS2 and pupil premium funding is used to employ additional staff to enable this to take place.  Pupil premium children are making more progress than non-pupil premium children and the gaps have closed considerably.

Needs analysis will continue to identify and prioritise individual children and Pupil Progress meetings will continue to monitor the progress of individual pupils and focus on removing the barriers to learning by effectively mapping provision.

Pupil Premium Strategy

At Mill Lane Primary School, we have high aspirations and ambitions for your children and we believe that no child should be left behind. We strongly believe that it is not about where our children come from but their passion and thirst for knowledge, and their dedication and commitment to learning that make the difference between success and failure. We are determined to ensure that the children of Mill Lane are given every chance to realise their full potential. Our school moto is, ‘We are unique and together we create a global family.  Shoot for the moon and you’ll land amongst the stars.’

We seek to ensure that every child has the best possible start to their education, that barriers to learning are removed and that every child has the opportunity to reach their full potential.  We see every child as an individual, but recognise that our school community has a diverse range of needs:

  • Over 50% of our children are learning English as an additional language (EAL);
  • Some of our children are new to the country and have never had any previous schooling;
  • We have a highly mobile population, meaning that many children do not stay with us throughout their whole primary education;
  • Many of our children with SEN have difficulties with speech, language and communication;
  • The school serves an area of high social deprivation;
  • Many children have multiple vulnerabilities.

56% of our pupils attract extra funding through the Pupil Premium Grant (PPG), as well as 60% who are entitled to the Early Years PPG.  The government provides this additional funding to schools in order to help them to address the barriers to learning. It is for each school to decide how this money should be spent, in order to meet the specific needs of the children in the school.  Due to the large percentage of pupils who attract additional funding at Mill Lane, in many cases we are focusing on enhancing provision to meet the needs of all children. In these cases, the Pupil Premium is used in proportionately. Barriers to learning include:

  • Language and vocabulary deficit
  • Limited social and cultural experience, ambition and aspiration
  • Mobility
  • Social deprivation
  • Extended leave
  • Social and emotional barriers
  • Poverty including ‘working poor’
  • Lower than average starting points
  • Health is in the lower 10% nationally for categories such as oral health
  • Undervalue education

At Mill Lane, we use the PPG to address six main objectives:

  • Early intervention: this approach ensures that the school is able to work with children and families to address needs as soon as possible;
  • Attendance: educational achievement requires good attendance;
  • Special Educational Needs: additional specialist resources;
  • Academic achievement: additional teaching and resources to promote progress for all, including support for parents to promote progress for all;
  • Participation: provision of resources to ensure that no child is unable to take part in any activity because of financial disadvantage;
  • Resilience: a school-wide focus on developing a growth mindset, ensuring that our children learn how to overcome barriers for themselves.

The impact of spending from the PPG is regularly reviewed by the Governing Body.  The dates for review this year are:

  • Tuesday 8th November 2016
  • Tuesday 21st March 2017
  • Tuesday 11th July 2017

Pupil Premium Allocation

2016-17

The Pupil Premium grant is a government initiative of an additional allocation of funding designed for schools to address current inequalities and tackle disadvantage by supporting the attainment and progress of specific groups of children who are vulnerable to possible underachievement. The Government are not dictating how schools should spend this money, but are clear that schools will need to employ the strategies that they know will support their pupils to increase their attainment.

In order to receive this additional funding, as a school we are required to provide information to the Department for Education confirming which children meet the government criteria:

Category Allocation per Eligible Pupil
FSM Children entitled to free school meals £1,320
Ever 6 Children who have received fee school meals in the last 6 years £1,320
CLA Children who have been looked after continuously for at least 6 months or who are looked after for one day or more, and those who are adopted from care or leave care under a special guardianship or residence order £1,900
Forces Children with a parent in the armed services £300
EYPP Children who are 3 and 4 years old who meet the above criteria £300

To be eligible for free school meals you must be in receipt of the appropriate benefits and have submitted an application for free school meals to the Local Authority Benefits Team (details of which are available from the school office).

If you qualify for the appropriate benefits, but have chosen not to apply for free school meals, please consider applying. You do not have to take up the free school meal to attract the funding. Free school meals cannot be backdated, so you should only apply if you currently qualify.

Our Philosophy and Principles

We are fully committed to providing opportunities for all pupils to succeed and to provide the necessary interventions to ensure that success is experienced by all. We ensure that

  • Teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all pupils
  • Appropriate provision is made for pupils who belong to vulnerable groups, this includes ensuring that the needs of disadvantaged pupils are adequately assessed and addressed
  • we recognise that not all pupils who receive free school meals will be disadvantaged
  • We also recognise that not all pupils who are disadvantaged are registered or qualify for free school meals
  • We reserve the right to allocate the Pupil Premium funding to support any pupil or groups of pupils the school has legitimately identified as being disadvantaged
  • Pupil premium funding will be allocated following data analysis and pupil progress meetings which identify priority classes, groups or individuals.
  • Children experience quality first teaching, meeting the needs of each individual child
  • Every child reaches or exceeds age-related expectations in reading, writing and mathematics
  • No child is disadvantaged due to inability to pay for school trips, residential visits, music tuition or other extra-curricular activities
  • Pupil Premium funding is allocated after a needs analysis and exploration of what research tells us to provide the most appropriate support and intervention for pupils

Pupil Premium Grant Allocation

2016-17 105 pupils £144,180
2015-16 108 pupils £142,560
2014-15 115 pupils £149,500

Early Years Pupil Premium Grant Allocation

2016-17 24 pupils £7,200

                  

Dates of Pupil Premium Reviews                             Tuesday 8th November 2016

Tuesday 28th February 2017

Tuesday 27th June 2017

AMBITION FOR DISADVANTAGED PUPILS IN OUR SCHOOL – SUCCESS CRITERIA

Barriers to learning will be removed and children in Mill Lane will achieve their full potential

·         Academic achievement

·         Early intervention

·         Special Educational Needs

·         Attendance

·         Participation                                                                                                                                                                                     C   = Cohort, including ARP children

·         Resilience, emotional health and well-being                                                                                                                              M = Mainstream children only

Supporting rationale and research for chosen action:

·         Education Endowment Fund * (See p8 & 9)

·         Higher Achievement Research Transforming Tees **

·         Effective Practice Case Study: St Bede’s Primary School, Stockton ***

MAIN OBJECTIVES ACTION TO ADDRESS BARRIER PLANNED IMPACT MONITORING OF EFFECTIVENESS AMOUNT ALLOCATED

Academic achievement

The employment of an additional teacher employed in KS2 to enable Year 6 children to be taught in smaller groups *

The employment of an additional 0.5 teacher (DH) in Y2 and Y4 to enable children to be taught in smaller groups *

The allocation of an additional TA in year 2 to enable adults to provide more high quality 1:1 feedback and feedforward to pupils *

Quality CPD

·         AfL Feedback/forward to develop writing *

·         Big Write*

·         boys attainment *

·         Tracks to Literacy *

·         Inference & Deduction Comprehension training *

·         Sound Training ***

·         EAL training ***

·         Reciprocal Reading training*

·         TA training to ensure quality first teaching ams and intervention pms to plug gaps and pre-teach

·         Leadership

·         Makaton Sign Language training

*Booster Reading \programme throughout school including Mid-day supervisor overtime to support 1:1 reading (BRP trained), Right to Read Programme with Johnson Matthey, Youth for Christ volunteer readers.

PiXL intervention and training*

Membership of the EEF and Literacy Campaign *

Purchase of RWI spelling programme for Year 2-6 to address spelling *

Purchase of resources for reading:

·         Purchase of resources, training and implementation of Read Write Inc *

·         Purchase of new reading scheme for guided reading and Reciprocal Reading and new home reading scheme *

·         Purchase of Cracking Comprehension ICT programme *

All children to have access to Quality First Teaching raise attainment and rates of progress

Children to have access to support to plug gaps in learning and to pre-teach to enable children to access age appropriate curriculum

Increase in staff confidence and improved outcomes

All pupils have a balanced curriculum delivered by expert practitioners

Improved outcomes

Improved outcomes

Improved writing outcomes

Improved reading outcomes

Improved reading outcomes

Promote a love of reading at home

Improved reading outcomes

KS2

2014   2015    2016   2017

Reading

C  68%   43%    27%    54%

M 73%   50%    27%    64%

Writing

C  68%     38%    35%   54%

M 73%     44%    35%  64%

Maths

C  71%     57%    62%   50%

M 77%     61%    62%  59%

SPAG

C  64%     48%     50%      %

M 69%     56%     50%      %

CRWM

C  61%     29%     23%  55%

M 65%     33%     23% 46%

KS1

2014   2015    2016  2017

Reading

C  39%    52%    59%    55%

M 41%    57%    57%   64%

Writing

C  26%    42%    59%    55%

M 28%    47%   57%    64%

Maths

C  45%     61%   68%    55%

M 48%     67%   66%   64%

GLD

2014   2015    2016   2017

C  0%     3%      48%     55%

M 0%     4%      50%     64%

Y1 Phonics

2014   2015    2016  2017

C  70%   67%     63%    69%

M 70%   67%    58%    65%

Total of 22 children assessed – quicker access to services

£16,500

£11,300

£7,850

£8,500

£3,500

£2,200

£2,000

£1000

£6,000

£8,400

£550

Early intervention

The employment of an additional TA to work alongside KS2 classes to support intervention activities to tackle underachievement identified in Pupil Progress meetings *

Barriers to learning are removed to enable accelerated progress

£9,800

Special Educational Needs

The allocation of 1.5 highly trained TAs to develop and deliver high quality early intervention and support with early SALT provision, including oral language and semantics and learning interventions identified in Pupil Progress Meetings *

The allocation of an EY apprentice to facilitate interaction within the areas *

The employment of an additional Speech and Language Therapist *

The allocation of an Educational Psychologist to ensure faster access to services

Children’s speech and language development is supported and any barriers are addressed which will impact on their wider attainment, self-esteem and self-confidence

Improved communication

Improved communication

Improved outcomes

£16,280

£4,500

£11,200

£5,500

Attendance

Attendance review and Incentives to improve attendance

100% weekly attendance treats

100% term attendance vouchers

100% year attendance trip

Increased attendance of all groups which will impact on attainment and progress

Attendance data will improve from 94.9% last year to national average of 96% or better.

2014   2015    2016    2017

95.7% 95.7%  94.9%  96%

£5,000
Participation

Subsidise parental contributions to enable all children to access enrichment activities including educational visits, theatre visits and residential opportunities

Purchase uniforms, PE Kits and Book bags

 

 

 

 

 

To widen children’s experiences through a broad and rich curriculum and to enhance their knowledge and understanding of the curriculum

Children develop a range of life skills and experiences and develop a love of learning

To ensure that poverty proofing enables all children to participate fully in education and does not feel discriminated against

Pupil outcomes above

Children wear school uniform with pride. Through all aspects of school, children consistently display good attitudes to learning, respect for school and the core values

£3,300

£10,000

Resilience, emotional health and well-being

Provide a Parent Support Advisor(PSA), Julie Cole, to work with our more vulnerable families on: Attendance, Safeguarding (Child Protection and Early Help) and Emotional well being

Provide a family counselling service for vulnerable pupils to enable a greater range and depth of issues faced by children and families to be tackled

 

 

 

 

 

Stability of key children, enabling them to attend, be ready to learn and be emotionally supported.

Greater understanding of the needs of children in order to succeed in school

Parents feel supported

Children will have a clear direction of who can offer emotional support

Engagement for learning will be improved

Relationships between children will be improved

Improved relationships between parents and school

Attendance will increase to from 94.9% to 96% – monitored monthly

Children’s View Questionnaires

Parent View

Emotional issues not impacting of children’s learning – data each half term

Improved attendance

so that it is comparable to national average of 96%

Children’s View Questionnaires

Parent View

CPOMs

£12,000

£6,000

EEF Research

Evidence Statement Evidence Strength Actions Implemented Date By Whom Impact
  Develop pupils’ speaking and listening skills and wider understanding of language Extensive

·         Tracks to Literacy Scheme introduced to EYFS and KS1.

·         Talk Boost intervention delivered by KS1 additional TA.

·         Additional EAL training to help develop vocabulary

Autumn 2

Autumn 1 and ongoing

Spring 1

SENCo

EAL Advisor

TAs are reporting greater increase in confidence in pupils but cannot measure quantitatively at this point.
Use a balanced and engaging approach to developing reading, which integrates both decoding and comprehension skills Extensive

·         RWI books introduced into KS1.

·         New guided reading scheme introduced so that have access to more challenging resources.

·         New reading scheme purchased to promote enjoyment of reading at home.

·         Introduction of Cracking Comprehension

·         Booster Reading Programme : A system is now in place across school so that all classes receive 1:1 reading support from trained adults throughout the week

Spring 1

Spring 2016

Spring 1

Autumn 2

Autumn 1

English Lead

HT

Right 2 Read, Youth 4 Christ, MDS.

Reading Predictions:

Y2 64% (M) 55% (C)

Rec 59%(M) 55% (C)

Effectively implement a systematic phonics programme Very Extensive

·         RWI introduced to EYFS and KS1.

·         Whole school staff training to ensure that all staff understand the principles behind effective phonics teaching

Spring 1 English lead, KI (Phonics Lead) ·         After testing Yr 1 pupils, phonics projections at 69%; Yr 2 re-check at 50%.
Teach pupils strategies for developing and monitoring their reading comprehension Extensive

·         Introduction of Cracking Comprehension across school, with training.

·         All staff received inference and deduction training as part of PD Day

·         All teaching staff have received Reciprocal reading training.

Autumn 2

Autumn1

Autumn 1 and 2

HT

HT

Reading Predictions:

Y2 64% (M) 55% (C)

Rec 59%(M) 55% (C)

Teach pupils strategies for planning and monitoring their writing Moderate

·         Introduction of BIG Write across school

·         PD Day on effective marking, editing and proof reading of children’s writing

Autumn 1

Spring 2

English Lead

HT

Writing predictions:

Rec  59% (M)  55% (C)

Y1   63%(M)    58% (C)

Y2   61% (M)   52% (C)

Promote fluent written transcription skills by encouraging extensive and effective practise and explicitly teaching spelling Limited ·         Year 2+ have access to the RWI spelling programme to ensure all spelling patterns are taught across school. Autumn 2 English Lead
Use high quality information about pupils current capabilities to select the best next steps for teaching Moderate ·         Regular pupil progress meetings held after assessment week to monitor progress and discuss next steps for pupils who appear ‘stuck’ On-going HT Teachers more accountable for pupil’s progress and discussions re interventions and new strategies for pupils falling behind take place.
Use high-quality structured interventions to help pupils who are struggling with their literacy Extensive ·         Talk Boost, Tracks to Literacy, 1:1 RWI phonics intervention carried out on pupils identified after pupil’s progress meetings or assessments. On-going TAs, Phonics lead TA feedback to T effectiveness of these programmes.  This is again monitored to ensure that chn are making grounds as a result of interventions during PPMeetings.

Pupil Premium

Data 2016

SECTION ONE: School Context

Number on roll:  195 School Deprivation Factor: 0.47 National deprivation average:  0.24

% Ever 6 FSM

% SEN support

% SEN statement/EHCP

% EAL

% Ethnic minority pupils

% School stability

LAC

School data:

54.9%

(P.P. 56.4%)

16.7%

1.6%

54.4%

65.1%

69.3%

1.5%

National average (2015):

26%

13%

1.4%

19.5%

30.7%

85.9%

Attendance for academic year

(2015-16 compared to national 2014-15)

% Persistent absence

 (2015 – 16 compared to national 2014-15)

Number of fixed term exclusions

(% NOR) (2014-15)

School data:

94.9%

10.9%

0%

National average:

96%

10.5%

0.07%

2016 results                                                                                                          MAINSTREAM ONLY

(Excluding S&L ARP children)

Key indicator

National/LA

All

Disadvantaged

Non disadvantaged

National

Other

EY GLD

65% (LA)

50%

40% (5)

50% (26)

72%

Phonics Y1

83.2% (LA)

63%

56% (16)

59% (17)

83%

KS1 Reading

76% (LA)

67%

59% (17)

77% (13)

77%

KS1 Writing

68.4% (LA)

67%

65%

69%

68%

KS1 Maths

75.6% (LA)

77%

76%

77%

75%

KS1 CRWM

63.5% (LA)

60%

59%

62%

n/a

KS2 Reading

66% (National)

27%

28% (18)

25% (8)

72%

KS2 Writing

74% (National)

35%

33%

38%

74%

KS2 SPaG

72% (National)

50%

56%

38%

78%

KS2 Maths

70% (National)

62%

61%

63%

76%

KS2 CRWM

53% (National)

23%

28%

13%

60%

KS2 Progress reading

0 / -0.3

-2.1 (22)

-2.9

-0.6

+0.33

KS2 Progress writing

0 / 0.4

-7.3 (23)

-7.5

-7.0

+0.12

KS2 Progress maths

0 / 0.5

+1.3 (23)

-0.2

+4.0

+0.24

COHORT

(Including S&L ARP children)

Key indicator

National/LA

All

Disadvantaged

Non disadvantaged

National

Other

EY GLD

65% (LA)

48%

40% (5)

50% (26)

72%

Phonics Y1

83.2% (LA)

58%

56% (16)

59% (17)

83%

KS1 Reading

76% (LA)

59%

56% (18)

63% (16)

77%

KS1 Writing

68.4% (LA)

59%

61%

56%

68%

KS1 Maths

75.6% (LA)

68%

72%

63%

75%

KS1 CRWM

63.5% (LA)

53%

56%

50%

n/a

KS2 Reading

66% (National)

27%

28% (18)

25% (8)

72%

KS2 Writing

74% (National)

35%

33%

38%

74%

KS2 SPaG

72% (National)

50%

56%

38%

78%

KS2 Maths

70% (National)

62%

61%

63%

76%

KS2 CRWM

53% (National)

23%

28%

13%

60%

KS2 Progress reading

0 / -0.3

-2.1 (22)

-2.9

-0.6

+0.33

KS2 Progress writing

0 / 0.4

-7.3 (23)

-7.5

-7.0

+0.12

KS2 Progress maths

0 / 0.5

+1.3 (23)

-0.2

+4.0

+0.24